Fitness & Fat Loss

Coffee May Protect Against Cancer

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Coffee may protect against cancer

Pouring A Cup Of Brewed Black Coffee

Love your cup of jo? There is good news for you. Your favorite beverage may actually be good for your health. Coffee may protect you against certain forms of cancer.

In what can now be regarded as a reversal of a previous determination of coffee as possibly carcinogenic, a panel of experts convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) affirmed this favorable finding.

Previously, coffee had been linked to risk of bladder and pancreatic cancer. However, this assessment has since been revised and one of the world’s most consumed drinks (besides water) is now “unclassifiable as to its carcinogenicity”, meaning there’s not sufficient evidence that it causes cancer.

In fact, what evidence points to is “reduced risk of several cancers” associated with coffee drinking.

The experts did actually identify one risk though not directly from coffee itself. Drinking it too hot may contribute to esophageal cancer. However, this goes for virtually all hot beverages, not just coffee. The key is to avoid drinking excessively hot beverages.

This is just one of myriad findings regarding the health benefits of drinking up to five cups of coffee a day. Some studies reviews indicate that coffee drinkers live longer than non-coffee drinkers. One study conducted by the Harvard school of health researchers showed “lower risk of mortality” associate with higher consumption of coffee.[1]

The appetite suppressing and metabolism increasing properties of coffee may aid in weight loss. Some coffee products and by-products such as green coffee bean extract have been linked to weight loss and antioxidant properties.

It is not yet clear why coffee seems to protect against some forms of cancer. It has been suggested that it could be its antioxidant, and/or cancer-cell killing properties.


Resources:

[1] Association of Coffee Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in Three Large Prospective Cohorts

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